How to Make Music That Makes People Happy

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Music has the power to make us feel good, even when it’s sad. But why do some songs get stuck in our heads and others don’t? And what makes one person love a song while another can’t stand it? It’s important to understand how your listeners are experiencing your music, and sometimes that means getting inside their headspace.

Lil baby’s short quotes play an important role when it comes to the art of writing a song. The right quote can inspire you, help you find the perfect metaphor, or even give you a musical idea. But what if your song is already finished? How do you add lyrics to it without ruining the flow?

This article will help you discover everything you need to know about creating music that makes people happy.

 

Get happy.

If you’re not happy with your life, or if you’re unhappy with the way things are going in life, it will show in your music and it will be harder to make people happy through it. On the other hand, if everything is going well for you, you love what you do and where you’re living, your audience can feel that energy coming from within their speakers when they listen to your music.

 

Set a happy tone.

Choose upbeat music. Even if you’re writing about something sad or difficult, you can still use music that evokes positive emotions. For example, if you’re writing about losing your job, try listening to songs with lyrics like: “I wish I was eighteen again,” “All my dreams are coming true,” and “I’ve got all my life to live,” etc.

Or, if you’re feeling lethargic and unmotivated at work or home after being in bed for a long time with an illness (or even just the flu), try listening to upbeat pop songs like “Uptown Funk” by Mark Ron son and Bruno Mars or “I Got the Feeling” by The Temptations.

These types of songs will make you feel better because they evoke positive images and emotions in us when we hear them.

 

Uplift with songwriting.

You want to lift people. You want them to feel good about themselves and the world in general. This can be accomplished through songwriting, but it requires a little more than just a catchy hook or an uplifting message.

You’re going to need a positive vocabulary, for one thing, words like “grateful,” “joyful,” and “contentment” all have positive connotations that will help you get your audience feeling good about themselves and their surroundings (and who doesn’t like being happy?).

You might also consider using positive imagery, images that make people think of things they love rather than hate. When writing lyrics about love or friendship.

For example, try mentioning the beach instead of war or disease; if your song is about family members getting together on Thanksgiving, maybe paint an image of everyone laughing around the table together instead of sitting in silence at home alone eating leftover turkey sandwiches from last year’s party because nobody else wanted any either.

 

Add positive lyrics.

Music with positive lyrics is more likely to make people happy. Music with negative lyrics is less likely to make people happy. This is because we are drawn to what we like and repelled by what we don’t like, and positive music makes us feel good while negative music makes us feel bad.

When you write your song, try to use words that express love, peace, hope, happiness, and other positive emotions that will create an uplifting vibe in your song and make the listener feel good about themselves.

 

Make your music happy.

If you want to make music that people will love, there’s one easy way to do it. Make your music happy. Happy music is more likely to be popular, shared, played, and played again.

If you don’t believe me, just ask a DJ or radio station manager if they’ll play a sad song, they won’t. And if they did, it would be the most depressing thing ever.

So what does this mean for you as an artist? If your goal is to have people hear your songs and share them with their friends and family (which I’m assuming it is), then being happy when writing music could help get them heard by the right people at the right time.

 

Don’t avoid the good stuff.

In the same way that you can’t go without eating and drinking, you also can’t avoid happiness. Life is what it is, and sometimes finding happiness comes from seeing the potential in things even when they aren’t exactly how we want them to be.

It’s important not to avoid the good stuff because it’s rare enough as it is, and if you don’t allow yourself access to it when you need a boost, then what are you going to do when times get tough?

 

Use positive imagery to evoke positive feelings.

Note that the key to creating a positive mood is not to use images with negative connotations. For example, if you are trying to create a happy mood and you use imagery of someone crying or feeling sad, your listeners will associate those feelings with their emotional state. This can be counterproductive because it might cause them to feel even more depressed than they were before listening.

Instead, look for positive imagery. It’s best if you can find pictures that evoke good feelings in people rather than bad ones, but sometimes this is difficult if you’re not familiar with what types of things make others happy (or at least what doesn’t make them upset). If necessary, ask friends or family members whom they think would enjoy hearing music created using only positive images.

I hope this article has brought some clarity to the question of how to make music that makes people happy. I’ve given you a lot of different tools and techniques to try, but ultimately you need to find your own and be true to yourself.

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